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1. Breaking into Film
Finding a job in the film industry is like trying to find a sunken vessel lost at sea: it is not only difficult it's an art. This is because the movie making business is a hidden market. Employers and employees rely on reputation, word-of-mouth, and netwo


2. The Importance of Correspondence
I have written a lot about creating a resume and about using letters to find work in the industry. I must say that written communication in the film industry is very, very important in establishing yourself solid in the


3. Saying Thank You
Thank-you letters are a very effective means of communication when you're searching for a job in the film industry and if you want to maintain your presence in the industry.


4. Why You Should Work in Film
Just about everybody loves going to the movies, including you. If you didn't you wouldn't be reading my column. Just walking into a movie theater, buying your ticket, and finding a seat in the dimly lit auditorium excites you. And once the house lights go


5. The Filmmaking Team
Above-the-line and below-the-line job positions and descriptions in Production.


6. Jobs in Pre-Production
Positions in Pre-Production and their individual roles and responsibilities.


7. Jobs in Production
Positions, duties and responsibilities on the set.


8. Dress for a Successful Interview
So many times I get asked what is the appropriate dress for an interview for a job in film production. A lot of times dress depends on where you will be working in the production because you should be dressing for that department. For example, wardrobe pe


9. Networking Letters
Networking letters are among the most important you will write during your job search. The purpose of these letters is to approach individuals in the film business for career information, advice, and referrals. They are


10. Networking- Building Contacts
Being "discovered" at a cafe does happen but rarely. Most often, people become stars -- or successful behind-the-scenes workers -- by moving step-by-step up through the ranks of the industry. And they do it by networking.


11. Non-Paying Jobs and Internships
In addition to full-time and freelance jobs, there's actually a third way you can work in the film industry -- for free. It probably doesn't sound like a very good idea and certainly not something you'd want -- or be able -- to do for too long, but it is


12. About That Interview
I have written about how to prepare for interviews and what to do at interviews, but there are three additional points to keep in mind during and after the interview.


13. Career Research- Deciding What You Want
Indeed, there are hundreds of hardworking, talented and creative people for every actor in front of the camera. These people include set painters, electricians, sound recordists, makeup artists, film editors, publicists,


14. Networking in Industry Organizations
Involving yourself in one way or another with film-related organizations is an excellent way of meeting people. Take classes and attend workshops offered by universities, film schools, learning annexes, etc. It's a great way to meet people. You can usuall


15. He Jumped the Fence
Terrence Michael began his film career at Warner Bros. by hopping over the fence and knocking on a random door that happened belonged to Richard Donner (Lethal Weapon). To this day Terrence has produced or executive produced 18 films.


16. Know Before you Go
Success in the film industry is 80 percent preparation and 20 percent show, as I explained in my earlier column about practicing for the interview, so it's essential that you go into the interview completely prepared.


17. Staying in Touch- A Success Story
For the next couple of columns I am going to devote my time to "success stories" about people who made it into the business, with the inference that if you read about these successes you will learn and apply some or all of what they did to "get in" the bu


18. Letters Are Important Too
After getting your resume honed and professional looking, letters are the second important phase of presenting yourself in writing to potential film employers and, like resumes, can make a lasting impression on their readers. Skilled letters involve more


19. Investing in Free Work
First of all, working for free in the film business doesn't sound like a very good idea and certainly not something you'd want -- or be able -- to do for too long, but it is a way to get a foot in the door.


20. Before Your First Interview
Before you go through an actual interview, you should first go through a rehearsal interview. Ask a friend, family member or neighbor to play the role of the interviewer. By doing this you'll place yourself at the cutting edge of the job hiring process be


21. What It Takes to Work in the Biz
If you want a career in film, it is important that you determine what profession you want to be before you pursue your career. Knowing what you want to "be" in the business is sometimes overlooked by people. It is a simple aspect, but if you neglect it yo


Recent Articles

1. Jobs in Pre-Production
Positions in Pre-Production and their individual roles and responsibilities.


2. Jobs in Production
Positions, duties and responsibilities on the set.


3. The Filmmaking Team
Above-the-line and below-the-line job positions and descriptions in Production.


4. He Jumped the Fence
Terrence Michael began his film career at Warner Bros. by hopping over the fence and knocking on a random door that happened belonged to Richard Donner (Lethal Weapon). To this day Terrence has produced or executive produced 18 films.


5. Staying in Touch- A Success Story
For the next couple of columns I am going to devote my time to "success stories" about people who made it into the business, with the inference that if you read about these successes you will learn and apply some or all of what they did to "get in" the bu


6. Career Research- Deciding What You Want
Indeed, there are hundreds of hardworking, talented and creative people for every actor in front of the camera. These people include set painters, electricians, sound recordists, makeup artists, film editors, publicists,


7. What It Takes to Work in the Biz
If you want a career in film, it is important that you determine what profession you want to be before you pursue your career. Knowing what you want to "be" in the business is sometimes overlooked by people. It is a simple aspect, but if you neglect it yo


8. The Importance of Correspondence
I have written a lot about creating a resume and about using letters to find work in the industry. I must say that written communication in the film industry is very, very important in establishing yourself solid in the


9. Saying Thank You
Thank-you letters are a very effective means of communication when you're searching for a job in the film industry and if you want to maintain your presence in the industry.


10. Networking Letters
Networking letters are among the most important you will write during your job search. The purpose of these letters is to approach individuals in the film business for career information, advice, and referrals. They are


11. Letters Are Important Too
After getting your resume honed and professional looking, letters are the second important phase of presenting yourself in writing to potential film employers and, like resumes, can make a lasting impression on their readers. Skilled letters involve more


12. Investing in Free Work
First of all, working for free in the film business doesn't sound like a very good idea and certainly not something you'd want -- or be able -- to do for too long, but it is a way to get a foot in the door.


13. About That Interview
I have written about how to prepare for interviews and what to do at interviews, but there are three additional points to keep in mind during and after the interview.


14. Dress for a Successful Interview
So many times I get asked what is the appropriate dress for an interview for a job in film production. A lot of times dress depends on where you will be working in the production because you should be dressing for that department. For example, wardrobe pe


15. Know Before you Go
Success in the film industry is 80 percent preparation and 20 percent show, as I explained in my earlier column about practicing for the interview, so it's essential that you go into the interview completely prepared.


16. Before Your First Interview
Before you go through an actual interview, you should first go through a rehearsal interview. Ask a friend, family member or neighbor to play the role of the interviewer. By doing this you'll place yourself at the cutting edge of the job hiring process be


17. Networking in Industry Organizations
Involving yourself in one way or another with film-related organizations is an excellent way of meeting people. Take classes and attend workshops offered by universities, film schools, learning annexes, etc. It's a great way to meet people. You can usuall


18. Networking- Building Contacts
Being "discovered" at a cafe does happen but rarely. Most often, people become stars -- or successful behind-the-scenes workers -- by moving step-by-step up through the ranks of the industry. And they do it by networking.


19. Non-Paying Jobs and Internships
In addition to full-time and freelance jobs, there's actually a third way you can work in the film industry -- for free. It probably doesn't sound like a very good idea and certainly not something you'd want -- or be able -- to do for too long, but it is


20. Why You Should Work in Film
Just about everybody loves going to the movies, including you. If you didn't you wouldn't be reading my column. Just walking into a movie theater, buying your ticket, and finding a seat in the dimly lit auditorium excites you. And once the house lights go


21. Breaking into Film
Finding a job in the film industry is like trying to find a sunken vessel lost at sea: it is not only difficult it's an art. This is because the movie making business is a hidden market. Employers and employees rely on reputation, word-of-mouth, and netwo


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